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The Daily Show With Jon Stewart

Paul Thomas Anderson News/Business. Paul Thomas Anderson. (2012) Director Paul Thomas Anderson. New. (CC)

NETWORK

DURATION
00:30:00

RATING
PG-13;L

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Virtual Ch. 63 (COM-W)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
528

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

America 9, Paul Thomas Anderson 3, Brickleberry 2, Allen 2, Jon Stewart 2, Jon 2, Mitch 2, Missouri 2, Us 2, Stoney Shaw 1, John Oliver 1, Karl Rove 1, Jerry Sandusky 1, David Donnellly 1, Buckner 1, Sphwhork 1, Sperm 1, Patrick Murphy 1, Tami Duckworth 1, Joe Walsh 1,
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  Comedy Central    The Daily Show With Jon Stewart    Paul Thomas Anderson  News/Business. Paul Thomas  
   Anderson.  (2012) Director Paul Thomas Anderson. New. (CC)  

    October 11, 2012
    11:00 - 11:30pm PDT  

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and don't forget to see me on tour. i've been told i'm equally good looking in person. and finally, the cat's out of the bag. i am executive producing a show called brickleberry. variety called it "tiresome and too eager too offend." but that's out of context. the full article was very negative. >> here's this week's spoiler alert. a russian drug cartel invades brickleberry. goodnight. sleep tight. and i will be dreaming of you with all my might. [ music ] >> from comedy central's world news headquarters in new york, this is "the daily show" with jon stewart. ["daily show" theme song playing] [cheers and applause] >> jon: hey, everybody. welcome to "the daily show." yeah, that's right. it's really just scribbles. [ laughter ]
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my name is jon stewart. director paul thomas anderson is joining us to talk about his new film "the master" which is in no way a devastating critique of anything. [ laughter ] is that good enough? will they leave us alone now? tonight, of course, was the vice presidential debate. shocking development, nobody saw this coming, both vice presidential candidates tonight on national coming out day came out simultaneously during the debate. [ laughter ] the real winners tonight, two lucky fellas to be named later. [ laughter ] you know, we spend a lot of time talking about the choices for president and vice president. some express frustration with limited options. did you know that the four men that we have are by far the cream of crop in washington or as we refer it to the cream of crap. [ laughter ] we salute their down ticket
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brethren in a segment called "you magnificent bastards." we'll start in missouri where lucky show me staters could turn todd akin into a republican senator. he has ideas frnch what i understand from doctors that's really rare. if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> jon: yeah, the female body shuts it down. if it's legitimate rape. todd akin on the vaginas magical powers. yes, kit repel rape sperm. it can turn ordinary rocks into beautiful gems in minutes and this is true, this is new, the new upgraded operating system vagina, two vaginas that pass each other can swap playlists. [ laughter ] didn't know that. now, people are going i've got to upgrade. since the comments akin has gone from an 11 point lead to six
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points behind the incumbent but some folks like reverend stoney shaw are sticking with him. >> some of my family was, you know, my children, dad, you're not going to support him, are you? everybody is turning against him. i said, well there was another guy everybody turned against. >> jon: jerry sandusky? no. [ laughter ] bill buckner? [ laughter ] american idol as sanjaya. >> there was another guy everybody turned against jesus christ but he prevailed. ♪ >> jon: sorry i'm getting a call hold on. [ laughter ] yeah, hey, hey, jesus, yeah i heard it. i think it's ridiculous, too, that you jesus are compared to todd akin. don't be insecure you are the king of kick, my friend. don't worry about it.
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see you sunday in tebow's spot. all right. [ laughter ] here is the thing -- akin could still win this thing but even if he does it would say a lot less about jesus-y he is and a lot more about how (bleep) missouri s. americans don't vote based on silly side issues like whether you have an eighth grade level grasp of female productive system. no what matters is how much you out america. >> february 16, 2003. lieutenant colonel allen west prepare his known go to war. that night south beach miami. patrick murphy is thrown out of a club for fighting, covered in alcohol unable to stand. two men a country in crisis you decide. >> jon: the choice is so hard. let's see one is an
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uncontrollable lunatic and the other got thrown out of a bar once. [ laughter ] the republicans don't have a monopoly on military veterans. democrat tami duckworth who lost her legs in iraq is running against joe walsh. has to tough against running against someone who sacrificed so much for the country. >> i believe she talks about her service too much. i'm running against a woman my god that's all she talks about. our true heros, the men and women who served us it's the last thing in the world they talk about. >> jon: if you talk about your service you are not a true hero. i have someone you should talk. >> tom: lieutenant colonel allen west just received deployment orders and prepares his known go to war. >> jon: can i be there when you tell him he is not a real hero. i don't think he's going to take
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that so well. he caught a lot of flack for that remark. he seems to have learned the lesson. he takes cheap petty shots on the service when there's so many shots you can take. >> tami was on a stage in charlotte. if you can look at the picture picking out a dress for your speech tuesday night. that's what i was doing. [ laughter ] >> jon: what does that do to a picture of her picking out a dress for her convention speech? [ laughter ] here is another one. look. this will is her coming out of the shower in a robe. [ laughter ] what is she doing in a robe? moving out of her shower. what? look at it. i'm not the crazy one. you're the crazy one. [ laughter ] of course, not all the paragons
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are locked in battles. some like georgia congressman paul brown are running unopposed. we'll check in. >> all that stuff talking about evolution, all that is lies scraipped. i don't believe this serge 9,000 years old. i believe it's created in six days as we know them. that's what the bible says. [ laughter ] >> jon: first of all, who gives a speech in deer hell? [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] i'm neither a hunter or an interior decorator but surely there's a happy medium to be had here. perhaps you could get to stand in front of some of the deer you've killed and yet we still
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get to see some wall. at some point it stops being hunter's pride and just looks like ethnic cleansing. we have always been at war with the deer. [ laughter ] round them up and send them to deer cow. [ laughter ] second of all the guy who said the earth is 9,000 years old and is created in six literal days is running unopposed and sits on the house committee on science and technology. [ laughter ] don't worry i'm sure there's other people on the committee who balance his viewpoint out. let's meet one. >> if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> jon: magic vagina guy? are you sure this isn't a house committee against science and technology? you might wonder yourself how dl those (bleep) crazy people make it to the national stage?
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easy. they do it by less crazy than the guys on the state level. >> arkansas state representative john hubbard says slavery was a blessing in disguise. it's in his self pub lished book. he said had it not been for slavey black people would have remained in africa and enjoyed the -- not enjoyed the advantages of living in america. >> really can't believe that was self published. can't believe simon and schiewt schuster didn't grab that guy. in the state house of representatives they think the mini series "roots" should have been called "thanks." >> jon: welcome back to the
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show. [cheers and applause] money in politics, there's been a lot of talk about its terrible core rosive democracy-destroying effects but is there an upside. john oliver has more. >> mega donor and super pacs are spending big flooding the airwaves with an unprecedented
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quantity of political ideas. it's no prize people are upset. >> this is the most expensive election ever. >> our political system is really going down the tubes. we've got to get money out of politics. >> political activist david donnellly explains the problem. >> with a lot more money in elections you see potential for corruption. the source of a money is a small number of people. this man for example. >> how much is he worth? >> >> $25 billion. >> there's some milk left in that cow. >> there's a lot of milk left. >> we have to milk that man. >> that's what karl rove is doing right now. >> milling him for america. come on. >> not for america -- >> ahhh. >> the point is that some people see crisis where others see opportunity.
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this is a private stimulus package for the american economy. >> you are suggesting a jobs program through election spending. >> exactly. where is the problem? >> it doesn't benefit america. most americans are singed by it. >> really? what about these americans they are busy making hats and tote bags normally manufactured by anymoreible fingered malaysian children. it's thanks to election spending. we learn why. >> half work is directly election based. >> they could get the baseball hats cheaper from foreign sweatshops but they can't because -- >> if they get caught which they will it will cost so much more money to fix the problem, back pedal. apologize, change their message. >> these jobs are all in part built on the kind of electoral jinglism part of modern campaign culture. >> our business is built on
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thank you have the eagle by the balls, mitch. >> haven't heard that one before but it makes sense. >> all day, mitch. all day. the problem isn't that there's too much money in elections it's that there's not enough elections in the first place. luckily there's a way for us to fix that. >> our nation is in trouble. debt, foreclosures, a sluggish economy. but this is america and we've got a sim way to fix our problems. spend massive amounts of money to tell america how to fix our problems. it's called election spending. >> cut. >> hi, remember me with the pie? i'm an actress. i'm getting paid $313 for doing this. so is my son. and my back-up son. >> i'm just here in case this kid has a meltdown. >> there are mothers, our fathers, our coworkers but most
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importantly they are all paid actors. and it doesn't stop there. >> i work in post production adding to graphics. >> i make $1.75 an hour and i don't work fast. >> american money, american jobs like speaking into a microphone for cash and it could be so much bigger. in 2000 election spending was $3 billion n.2052 it could be 100% of the g.d.p. >> everyone who matters benefits opposition researchers, paid consultants, c.e.o.s of major media conglomerates and employees. this election should be about one issue, elections themselves. let's have more elections, constant elections, never-ending elections. it's not a terrible sickening idea, it's actually a great sickening idea. >> you think this was cheap? >> thank you, america! you're welcome, america.
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>> paid for by americans cute enough to be in [cheers and applause]
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jnch welcome back.
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my guest tonight a director and screen writer phone for boogie nights, magnolia and there will be blood. his latest is "the master. ". >> these problems you have. >> i don't have any problems. i don't know what you told you but if you have work for me to do, can i do it. >> you seem so familiar to me. >> yeah. what do you do? >> i do many, many things. i am a writer, a doctor, a nuclear physicist, a theoretical philosopher but above all i am a man hopelessly inquisitive man just like you. >> jon: i will follow you. please welcome paul thomas anderson. [cheers and applause]
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i don't even know where to start. i'm an enormous fan of yours. i'm going to start on the performance end of it for the actors. forget about the beautiful writing, the shooting, all the things you do. the performances you get from the actors that you have. obviously they are great actors, how do you -- as a director how do you feel like you are able to empower the actors to get the kind of performances you get? >> um, -- >> jon: i'll leave. >> [ laughter ] >> i hire good ones. >> jon: that helps. >> that helps and i try to do as much as i can in the writing and then try to listen to them and see how they feel about things give them room to do it. >> >> jon: in a scene after a take will you -- cut, walk out and be like -- you know that kind of thing? is there on set do you get maniacal. what is your temperament?
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>> pretty -- i don't know -- >> jon: you seem angry, you seem like an angry guy. >> i try to play it pretty cool. when you are a writer you can get mad at yourself in a room and bang your head against the wall. when you are a director you you have to pretend you didn't do that stuff and be cool and be everybody's boss. so -- >> joe: do you complete the writing process in your mind and then become the director or as you are writing are you -- you know, i find it's very difficult to -- the difference between writing for the page and writing for the performance is a different art form. do you do that as you are writing or transition that? >> when i write, when it's at its best whrveg it's going really well you blink your eyes and ten pretty good pages have happened. at its worst you are desperate to try to get it going well. when you get to the set, i just sort of throw the script out the window and hopefully they
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remember it and they know it and they've done it well. >> jon: you throw it out the window? do you ever tell yourself the writer, hey, man, don't sweat this i'm going to (bleep) ditch it? [ laughter ] >> yeah. [ laughter ] >> jon: i imagine myself with writing there are times where i -- it's difficult not to be precious with the word -- prescient with the words. to remember to convince yourself just put it on paper. so much writing is rewriting and you can hold yourself back from putting it out there. >> i think that's true. i've written 50 drafts of things. and thank god for saving everything you write. you sort of look back at the first thing and realize you had it right the first time because it vomited out of you or something like that. the other thing i have found is, you know, unfortunately sometimes you can write something 50 times and you can make it better. it creates this endless sort of
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reach for something that keeps you hungry and always guessing like how does this stuff work? how does writing sphwhork it's so confusing. >> jon: right. what makes you stop. what makes me stop here is it's 6:00. we'll right to the point where we're like, may, man, there's an audience out there and they look mad. they've been sitting there for five hours better do a show. but as a writer of film, how do you stop, how do you not overwrite? , detroit the on the back end? >> it's kind of same thing. the clock is not ticking that badly but basically it's like we're going to get together in march so -- and let's say that is six months away. you kind of, as a writer you have to go six months and the clock is ticking and you have to get it together. you have to plan that far ahead in advance. >> jon: right. >> but it's like a slow ticking bomb. [ laughter ] >> jon: let's talk catering --
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we have a different system here. once it's done, then you have all the post production and all the other things that you have to do. does the spelling of it feel like you are making something you did a long time ago? does it feel vital in your mind? how is it if that process. >> oh, god d -- god. i was watching that clip and i didn't remember what they were going to say. >> jon: i completely understand that. >> that's a nice place to get to, actually where you have enough distance from it. yeah, there's a lot that i don't breb this film already. [ laughter ] >> jon: i would love for m. night toll be one of his own movies and say that guy was dead the whole time? i can't believe that. [ laughter ] what i bliek what you do --
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everything is so -- you feel the art of it. it's so vivid. it's every choice you make. is that preconceived? do you you have an idea of each moment and how you want to create it? >> no. inhe have have itibly you are disappointed because usually the things you see in your head when you stand in a place with three dimensions they are different. the light coming through the window in a different way or somewhere is wearing something different so -- you try to be as open as possible to situations. but at the same time i can't just be the endless search. there's a lot of planning you have to do. hopefully you kind of -- you can create situation where accidents can't happen and things can go wrong. >> jon: the environment. aspiration but realistic. >> there you go. [ laughter ] >> jon: the master. it is a beautiful piece of film
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making. it's in theaters now. the great paul thomas anderson, ladies and gentlemen. [cheers $5
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